6. Accounting and Valuation Principles

The Annual Financial Statements of the companies included in the Consolidated Financial Statements are based on uniform accounting and valuation principles. The following specific accounting and valuation principles were applied.

Intangible Assets

Intangible assets are capitalised if the assets are identifiable, a future inflow of benefits can be expected and the acquisition and production costs can be ascertained reliably. Intangible assets acquired in return for payment are recognised at historical cost. Intangible assets with a finite useful life are amortised over their useful life on a straight-line basis. The Group reviews the underlying amortisation methods and the useful lives of its intangible assets with a finite useful life as of each balance sheet date.

Intangible assets with an indefinite useful life are subjected to an impairment test at least once a year. If necessary, value adjustments are made in line with future expectations. In the reporting period there were no intangible assets with an indefinite useful life apart from derivative goodwill.

Internally generated intangible assets are recognised at the costs incurred in their development phase between the time when technological and economic feasibility is determined and production. Costs include all directly attributable costs incurred during the development phase.

The capitalised amount of development costs is subject to an impairment test at least once per year if the asset is not yet in use or if there is evidence of impairment during the course of the year.

Useful Life of Intangible Assets

in years

 

2017

 

2016

Software

 

3 – 7

 

3 – 7

Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment is reported at the acquisition or production cost less accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment. The costs of ongoing maintenance are recognised immediately in profit and loss. The production costs include specific expenses and appropriate portions of attributable production overheads. Demolition obligations are included in the acquisition or production costs at the present value of the obligation as of the time when it arises and an equivalent provision is recognised at the same time. The HHLA Group does not use the revaluation method of accounting. The carrying amounts for property, plant and equipment are tested for impairment if there is evidence that the carrying amount exceeds the recoverable amount.

Depreciation is carried out on a straight-line basis over an asset’s useful life. The following table shows the principal useful lives which are assumed.

Useful Life of Property, Plant and Equipment

in years

 

2017

 

2016

Buildings

 

10 – 70

 

10 – 70

Technical equipment and machinery

 

5 – 25

 

5 – 25

Other plant, operating and office equipment

 

3 – 15

 

3 – 15

Borrowing Costs

According to IAS 23, borrowing costs which can be directly attributed to the acquisition or production of a qualifying asset are capitalised as a component of the acquisition or production cost of the asset in question. Borrowing costs which cannot be directly attributed to a qualifying asset are recognised as an expense at the time they are incurred.

Investment Property

Investment property consists of buildings held for the purpose of generating rental income or for capital gain, and not for supplying goods or services, for administrative purposes or for sale as part of normal business operations.

IAS 40 stipulates that investment property be held at acquisition or production cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Subsequent expenses are capitalised if they result in an increase in the investment property’s value in use. The useful lives applied are the same as those for property, plant and equipment used by the Group.

The fair values of these properties are disclosed separately in Note 24.

The carrying amounts for investment property are tested for impairment if there is evidence that the carrying amount exceeds the recoverable amount.

Impairment of Assets

As of each balance sheet date, the Group determines whether there are any indications that an asset may be impaired. If there are such indications, or if an annual impairment test is required, as in the case of goodwill, the Group estimates the recoverable amount. This is ascertained as the higher of the fair value of the asset less selling costs and its value in use. The recoverable amount must be determined for each asset individually unless the asset does not generate cash inflows which are largely independent of those generated by other assets or groups of assets. In this case the recoverable amount of the smallest cash-generating unit (CGU) must be determined. If the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount, the asset is deemed to be impaired and is written down to its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is generally calculated based on the fair value less selling costs of the cash-generating unit or asset using the discounted cash flow method. This involves discounting estimated future cash flows to their present value using a discount rate after tax which reflects current market expectations of the interest curve and the specific risks of the asset. As of the balance sheet date, the interest rate for discounting was between 4.7 and 5.4 % p. a. (previous year: 4.6 to 5.5 % p.a.). The cash flow forecasts in the Group’s current plans for the next five years were utilised to determine future cash flows. If new information is available when the financial statements are produced, it is taken into account. Growth factors of 1.0 % (previous year: 1.0 %) were applied in the reporting year. When forecasting cash flows the Group takes future market and sector expectations as well as past experience into account in its planning. Cash flows are primarily determined on the basis of anticipated volumes and income along with the cost structure arising from the level of capacity utilisation and the technology used.

On each reporting date an assessment is made as to whether an impairment loss recognised in prior periods no longer exists or has decreased. If there are such indications, the recoverable amount is estimated. Previously recognised impairment losses are reversed if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount since the last impairment loss was recognised. If this is the case, the carrying amount of the asset is raised to its recoverable amount. This higher carrying amount may not exceed the amount which would have been determined, less depreciation or amortisation, if no impairment losses had been recognised in prior years. Any such reversals must be recognised immediately in profit and loss for the period. Following a reversal, the amount of depreciation or amortisation must be adjusted in subsequent periods in order to write down the adjusted carrying amount of the asset, less any residual value, systematically over its remaining useful life.

Impairment losses on goodwill are not reversed.

Financial Assets

Financial assets as defined by IAS 39 are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit and loss, loans and receivables, investments held to maturity or available-for-sale financial assets.

Financial assets are initially recognised at fair value. In the case of financial investments for which no fair value through profit and loss is determined, directly attributable transaction costs are also included. The Group defines the classification of its financial assets on initial recognition and reviews this classification every financial year insofar as this is permitted and appropriate.

Financial assets are valued as of their settlement date, i.e. upon delivery and transfer of risk. The only exception is the valuation of derivatives, which are measured as of the trading day.

Financial Assets at Fair Value through Profit and Loss

Derivative financial instruments are classified as held for trading unless they are derivatives designated and effective as hedging instruments. Gains or losses from financial assets held for trading are recognised in profit and loss.

Loans and Receivables

Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments which are not quoted in an active market. These assets are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method. Gains and losses are recognised in the result for the period when the loans and receivables are derecognised or impaired and within the scope of repayment.

This category generally also includes trade receivables, receivables from related parties and other financial receivables. These are reported at amortised cost less allowances for doubtful receivables. Write-downs are made if there is substantial objective evidence that the Group will not be able to collect the receivables. Receivables are derecognised as soon as they are deemed to be irrecoverable. Examples of objective evidence are manifest shortages of liquid funds or the institution of insolvency proceedings against a customer. When assessing such situations, HHLA draws on its own data about the specific customer, external information and figures derived from experience.

Cash, cash equivalents and short-term deposits also included in this category are cash in hand, cheques, bank balances on deposit and short-term bank deposits which have a maturity of up to twelve months and which are recognised at their face value. Cash used as a pledge or collateral is disclosed separately.

Financial Investments Held to Maturity

Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or calculable payments and fixed maturities are classified as held-to-maturity financial investments if the Group intends to hold them until maturity and is capable of doing so. As of the balance sheet date, the Group had no held-to-maturity financial investments during the 2017 and 2016 financial years.

Available-for-Sale Financial Assets

Following their initial recognition, available-for-sale financial assets are measured at fair value on each balance sheet date. The gains or losses arising as a result are taken directly to equity, where they are recorded in a separate reserve. The reserve is reversed through profit and loss on disposal of the financial asset. If impairment losses are recorded based on objective evidence of impairment as per IAS 39.59 rather than valuation-based considerations alone, the impairment must be recognised in the income statement.

The fair values of financial instruments traded on organised markets are determined by reference to the prices quoted on the stock exchange on the balance sheet date. The fair values of financial instruments for which there is no active market are estimated using valuation methods. If the fair values cannot be determined reliably because they are not traded on an active market, they are valued at cost. This applies in particular to non-consolidated interests in affiliated companies and other equity investments.

Impairment of Financial Assets

On each balance sheet date the Group determines whether a financial asset or a group of financial assets is impaired.

Assets Carried at Amortised Cost

If there is an objective indication of impairment to loans and receivables carried at amortised cost, the loss is calculated as the difference between the carrying amount of the asset and the present value of expected future cash flows (excepting future credit defaults), discounted by the original effective interest rate of the financial asset (i.e. the interest rate determined on initial recognition). The amount of the loss must be recognised immediately in profit and loss. If the amount of the write-down decreases in one of the following reporting periods and this decrease can be ascribed objectively to circumstances occurring after the impairment was recognised, then the earlier impairment is reversed. A subsequent reversal of the impairment loss is recognised in profit and loss if the carrying amount of the asset at the time of the reversal does not exceed the amortised cost.

Assets Recognised at Cost

If there is an objective indication of impairment to a non-listed equity instrument that is not recognised at fair value because its fair value cannot be determined reliably, the amount of the write-down is the difference between the carrying amount of the financial asset and the present value of the estimated future cash flows, discounted at the current market rate of return for a comparable financial asset.

Available-for-Sale Financial Assets

If an available-for-sale financial asset is impaired, the difference recognised in equity between the acquisition cost (less any repayments and amortisation) and the current fair value, less any impairment allowances for the financial asset, is recognised in profit and loss. Reversals of impairment losses on equity instruments classified as available for sale are recorded directly in equity. Impairment of debt instruments is reversed in profit and loss if the increase in the instrument’s fair value can objectively be ascribed to an event which occurred after the impairment was recognised through profit and loss.

Inventories

Inventories include raw materials, consumables and supplies, work in progress, finished products and merchandise. They are initially recognised at acquisition or production cost. Measurement at the balance sheet date is made at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Standard sequence of consumption procedures are not used for valuation. Service work in progress is valued using the percentage of completion method if the result of the service transaction can be estimated reliably. Net realisable value corresponds to the estimated sales proceeds in the course of normal operations, less costs until completion and sale.

Liabilities

At initial recognition, liabilities are measured at the fair value of the equivalent goods or services received less transaction costs related to borrowing, including discounts and premiums.

After initial recognition, liabilities are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method.

This does not apply to derivatives recorded as liabilities, which are carried at fair value.

Throughput-Dependent Share of Earnings Attributable to Non-Controlling Interests

Background

In the 2010 financial year, profit and loss transfer agreements were signed between the subsidiaries HHLA Container-Terminal Altenwerder GmbH, Hamburg (CTA), and HHLA CTA Besitzgesellschaft mbH, Hamburg (CTAB), on the one hand and HHLA Container Terminals GmbH, Hamburg (HHCT), on the other. In the profit and loss transfer agreements, HHCT pledges to pay a financial settlement to the non-controlling interest in the above-mentioned companies for the duration of the agreement. The amount of the financial settlement is based largely on earnings and the throughput handled. Should throughput reach a certain level, it is possible for the proportion of earnings allocated to the financial settlement to exceed the share which would result from the non-controlling shareholder’s stake in the companies. The profit and loss transfer agreements were concluded for a fixed term for the financial years 2010 to 2014 (i.e. regular termination is impossible). A contract duration of five years was therefore assumed. Unless the profit and loss transfer agreement is terminated, it will be extended for a further year at the end of this period. CTA merged with CTAB with retroactive effect as of 1 January 2014 based on a merger agreement dated 5 August 2014. As a result, there is now just one profit and loss transfer agreement. On the same date, CTA Besitzgesellschaft mbH was renamed HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder GmbH. As a result of the merger of HHTC with Hamburger Hafen und Logistik Aktiengesellschaft (HHLA AG), a profit and loss transfer agreement with effect as of 1 January 2017 was transferred to HHLA AG in August 2017.

Classification as a Compound Financial Instrument

As profit and loss transfer agreements have been concluded, the interest held by the non-controlling shareholder is classified as a compound financial instrument as per IAS 32.28 because it contains both debt and equity components. These components must be split and entered as either equity or borrowed capital depending on their classification.

Initial Measurement

When it was first entered in 2010, the amount of equity to be reported for the non-controlling interests was calculated by deducting the fair value of the debt component. The fair value of the debt component in the form of these financial settlements was established by discounting the anticipated resulting cash outflows during the five-year term of the profit and loss transfer agreement.

When this debt component was first recorded under other financial liabilities Note 38, it was recognised directly in equity and reduced non-controlling interests within equity as a result Note 35.

From the 2014 financial year onwards, extending the profit and loss transfer agreement gives rise to an obligation to pay a financial settlement for the following year. The profit and loss transfer agreement was not terminated in 2017. This means the company has a further obligation to pay a financial settlement for the 2018 financial year. This obligation must also be reported at fair value directly in equity within other financial liabilities by discounting the anticipated cash outflows in the year under review. It reduces non-controlling interests within equity accordingly.

Subsequent Measurement

From 2011 onwards, other financial liabilities arising from the obligation to pay this financial settlement are recorded in the balance sheet at amortised cost. Changes resulting from the expected cash outflows are recognised in profit and loss. The changes result from adjustments to reflect the actual shares in the CTA Group’s earnings and changes in the anticipated future development of the CTA Group. Furthermore, the remaining term of the profit and loss transfer agreement was shortened by one year from 2011 onwards. As of 2013, the liability recognised shows the Group’s payment obligation for the financial year ended and the present value of the anticipated payment obligation for the following year. Obligations are discounted using an interest rate of 7.70 %. Every year from the 2014 financial year onwards, a discount rate is defined for the recognition of the expected current financial settlement. An interest rate of 5.44 % is used for recognising the expected financial settlement for the 2018 financial year (previous year: 5.46 % for 2017). Expenses of € 12,855 thousand (previous year: € 2,932 thousand) reported through profit and loss in the reporting year is recorded in financial income Note 16 and only impacts non-controlling interests in the CTA Group. This figure includes income of € 11,870 thousand (previous year: € 4,387 thousand) from an adjustment to reflect the actual share of earnings and expenses of € 985 thousand arising from the discounting payment obligation recognised in the previous year (previous year: € 1,455 thousand).

Development in Non-controlling Interests Held in the CTA Group

in € thousand

 

 

as of 31 December 2009 prior to conclusion of the profit and loss transfer agreement

 

44,617

as of 31 December 2015, taking actual share of earnings and adjustments to settlement obligation into account

 

- 6,888

Actual share in the CTA Group's earnings for 2016

 

22,603

Impact on financial income through profit and loss resulting from adjustment of the settlement obligation

 

2,932

Other adjustments

 

- 430

Comprehensive income reported in equity

 

25,105

Reclassification of the settlement obligation for 2017 to other financial obligations

 

- 18,045

as of 31 December 2016, taking actual share of earnings and adjustments to settlement obligation into account

 

172

Actual share in the CTA Group's earnings for 2017

 

30,900

Impact on financial income through profit and loss resulting from adjustment of the settlement obligation

 

- 12,855

Other adjustments

 

9

Comprehensive income reported in equity

 

18,054

Reclassification of the settlement obligation for 2018 to other financial obligations

 

- 22,620

as of 31 December 2017, taking actual share of earnings and adjustments to settlement obligation into account

 

- 4,394

Development in Other Financial Liabilities Arising from Settlement Obligations

in € thousand

 

 

as of 31 December 2015 with continuation of settlement obligation

 

47,161

Payment of actual share of earnings for 2015

 

- 21,627

Impact on financial income through profit and loss resulting from adjustment of the settlement obligation

 

- 2,932

Reclassification of settlement obligation for 2017 from non-controlling interests

 

18,045

as of 31 December 2016 with continuation of settlement obligation

 

40,647

Payment of actual share of earnings for 2016

 

- 22,603

Impact on financial income through profit and loss resulting from adjustment of the settlement obligation

 

12,855

Reclassification of settlement obligation for 2018 from non-controlling interests

 

22,620

as of 31 December 2017 with continuation of settlement obligation

 

53,519

Provisions

A provision is formed if the Group has a present (legal or factual) obligation arising from past events, the settlement of which is likely to result in an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits, and if the amount required to settle the obligation can be estimated reliably. The provision is formed for the amount expected to be necessary to settle the obligation, including future increases in prices and costs. If the Group anticipates a partial or full reimbursement of an amount made as a provision (e.g. in the case of insurance), the reimbursement is recognised as a separate asset only if it is virtually certain. The expenses arising from recognising the provision are disclosed in the income statement after the reimbursement has been deducted. If the interest effect is substantial, non-current provisions are discounted before tax at an interest rate which reflects the specific risks associated with the liability. In the event of discounting, the increase in the amount of the provision over time is recognised under interest expenses.

Pensions and Other Retirement Benefits

Pension Obligations

Pensions and similar obligations include the Group’s benefit obligations under defined benefit obligations. Provisions for pension obligations are calculated in accordance with IAS 19 (revised 2011) using the projected unit credit method. Actuarial gains and losses are taken directly to equity and recognised in other comprehensive income, after accounting for deferred taxes. Service expense affecting net income is recognised in personnel expenses and the interest proportion of the addition to provisions is recognised in the financial result.

Actuarial opinions are commissioned annually to measure pension obligations.

Phased Early Retirement Obligations

The compensation to be paid in the release phase of the so-called block model is recognised as provisions for phased early retirement. It is recognised pro rata over the working period over which the entitlements accrue. Since 1 January 2013 and in accordance with IAS 19 (revised 2011), provisions for supplementary amounts have only been accrued pro rata over the required service period, which regularly ends when the passive phase begins.

Actuarial opinions are commissioned annually to measure compensation obligations in the release phase of the block model and supplementary amounts.

If payment obligations do not become payable until after twelve months’ time because of entitlements in the block model or supplementary amounts, they are recognised at their present value.

Leases in Which the Group is Lessee

The question of whether an agreement is, or contains, a lease depends on the commercial content of the agreement and requires an assessment as to whether fulfilling the agreement depends on the use of a certain asset or assets and whether the agreement grants a right to use that asset.

Finance Leases

Finance leases – in which virtually all of the risks and potential rewards associated with ownership of an asset are transferred to the Group – are capitalised at the start of the lease at the lower of the leased asset’s fair value or the present value of the minimum lease payments. A lease liability is recognised for the same amount. Lease payments are divided into financing expenses and repayment of the lease liability, so that interest is paid on the remaining carrying amount of the lease liability at a constant rate. Financing expenses are recognised through profit and loss in the period in which they arise.

If the transfer of title to the Group at the end of the lease term is not sufficiently certain, capitalised leased assets are fully depreciated over the shorter of the lease term and the asset’s useful life. Otherwise, the period of depreciation is the leased asset’s useful life.

Operating Leases

Lease instalments for operating leases are recognised as expenses in the income statement on a straight-line basis over the duration of the lease.

Leases in Which the Group is Lessor

The HHLA Group lets properties in and around the Port of Hamburg as well as office properties, warehouses and other commercial space. The rental contracts are classified as operating leases, as the main risks and potential rewards of the properties remain with the Group. The properties are therefore held as investment properties at amortised cost.

Rental income from investment properties is recognised on a straight-line basis over the term of the leases.

Recognition of Income and Expenses

Income is recognised when it is probable that the economic benefit will flow to the Group and the amount of income can be determined reliably. The following criteria must also be met for income to be recognised:

Sale of Goods and Merchandise

Income is recognised when the principal risks and potential rewards incidental to ownership of the goods and merchandise sold have been transferred to the buyer.

Provision of Services

Income from services is recognised in proportion to the progress of the project in question. The extent to which the service has been provided is determined by the number of hours worked as of the balance sheet date as a percentage of the total number of hours estimated for the project. If the result of a service transaction cannot be estimated reliably, income is recognised only to the extent that the expenses incurred are eligible for reimbursement.

Interest

Interest income and interest expenses are recognised when they are accrued or incurred.

Dividends

Income from dividends is recognised in profit and loss when the Group has a legal right to payment. This does not apply to dividends distributed by companies accounted for using the equity method.

Income and Expenses

Operating expenses are recognised when the service is rendered or when the expense is incurred. Income and expenses resulting from identical transactions or events are recognised in the same period. Rental expenses are recognised on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

Government Grants

Government grants are recognised when there is reasonable certainty that they will be granted and the company fulfils the necessary conditions. Grants paid as reimbursement for expenses are recognised as income over the period necessary to offset them against the expenses for which they are intended to compensate. If grants relate to an asset they are deducted from the asset’s cost of purchase and recognised in profit and loss on a straight-line basis by reducing the depreciation for the asset over its useful life. The conditions for the subsidies include obligations to operate the subsidised equipment for a retention period of five to 20 years, observe certain operating criteria and provide the subsidising body with evidence for the use of the funds.

There is sufficient certainty that all the conditions have been or will be fulfilled for the grants totalling € 43,625 thousand which were paid to HHLA in the period between 2001 and 2017. These grants have been deducted from the cost of purchasing the subsidised investments. The HHLA Group received € 3,332 thousand in government grants in the reporting year.

Taxes

Current Claims for Tax Rebates and Tax Liabilities

Current claims for tax rebates and tax liabilities for the financial year and prior periods are measured at the amount for which a rebate is expected from, or payment must be made to, the tax authorities. The tax rates and tax legislation in force as of the balance sheet date are used to determine the amount.

Deferred Taxes

Deferred taxes are recognised by using the balance sheet liabilities method on all temporary differences between the carrying amount of an asset or liability in the balance sheet and the amount for tax purposes, as well as on tax loss carry-forwards.

Deferred tax liabilities are recognised for all taxable temporary differences.

Deferred tax assets are recognised for all deductible temporary differences and unused tax loss carry-forwards proportionate to the probability that taxable income will be available to offset against the deductible temporary differences and the unused tax loss carry-forwards.

The carrying amount of deferred tax assets is reviewed on each balance sheet date and reduced to the extent that it is no longer likely that sufficient taxable profits will be available to use against the deferred tax asset. Unrecognised deferred tax assets are reviewed on each balance sheet date and recognised proportionate to the likelihood that future taxable profits will make it possible to use deferred tax assets.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the tax rates expected to apply in the period in which the asset is realised or the liability is met. Tax rates (and tax regulations) are applied if they have already been enacted as of the balance sheet date.

Income taxes relating to items recognised directly in equity are recognised in equity, likewise not affecting net income.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are netted only if the deferred taxes relate to income taxes for the same tax authority and the current taxes may also be set off against one another.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The fair value of financial instruments is determined on the basis of market values or valuation methods. For cash and other current primary financial instruments, fair value is equivalent to the carrying amounts on the respective balance sheet dates. For non-current receivables and other financial assets, as well as non-current liabilities, fair value is measured based on expected cash flows using reference rates of interest at the balance sheet date. The fair value of derivative financial instruments is determined on the basis of reference interest rates and futures prices at the balance sheet date.

Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedging Transactions

The Group can use derivative financial instruments such as interest rate swaps, interest rate caps and currency futures to hedge against interest and currency risks. These derivative financial instruments are initially recognised at fair value at the time the contracts are concluded and subsequently remeasured at fair value.

Gains and losses from changes in the fair value of derivative financial instruments which do not meet the criteria for qualification as hedging transactions are recognised immediately through profit and loss.

For hedge accounting purposes, hedging instruments are classified as cash flow hedges if they serve as a hedge against risks arising from fluctuations in cash flows which can be attributed to a recognised asset or liability, or a forecast transaction.

A hedge for the currency risk of a fixed obligation is treated as a cash flow hedge.

At the beginning of a hedging relationship, the Group formally designates the hedging relationship to be recognised as a hedging transaction, as well as the risk management aims and strategies relating to the hedge, and documents them. The documentation includes identification of the hedging instrument, the hedged item or transaction, the nature of the risk being hedged and a description of how the company will assess the hedging instrument’s effectiveness in offsetting the exposure to changes in the hedged item’s fair value or cash flows attributable to the hedged risk. These hedging relationships are considered to be highly effective in offsetting changes in fair value or cash flows attributable to the hedged risk. The hedges are assessed on an ongoing basis to determine whether they were actually highly effective throughout the financial reporting period for which the hedge was designated.

There were no hedging transactions to hedge fair value or net investments in a foreign operation during the reporting period. Cash flow hedges which meet the strict criteria for recognition as hedging relationships are recognised as follows:

Cash Flow Hedges

The effective portion of gains or losses from changes in the fair value of a hedging instrument is recognised directly in equity, taking into account the deferred taxes, while the ineffective portion is recognised in profit and loss.

The amounts recognised in equity are recorded in the income statement in the period affected by the hedged transaction, e.g. when the hedged financial income or expense affects profit and loss or when a forecast sale or purchase occurs. If the hedged transaction is the acquisition cost of a non-financial asset or a non-financial liability, the amounts recognised in equity are added to the originally recognised carrying amount of the non-financial asset or liability.

If the forecast transaction is no longer expected to occur, the amounts previously recognised in equity are recognised in profit and loss for the period. If the hedging instrument expires, or is sold, terminated or exercised, or rolled over into another hedging instrument, or if the Group withdraws the designation as a hedging instrument, the amounts previously recognised in equity remain separately recognised in equity until the forecast transaction occurs.